Happenings at the College:
Remembrance Day 2018

On Monday  12 November 2018  the College will hold a special assembly to mark Remembrance Day 2018.

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The College’s Assistant Principal, Ms Marietta Taliana reflected on this year’s centenary of armistice in the newsletter. Her article is below:

On Sunday we celebrate Remembrance Day. It is the centenary of armistice!

 

What does armistice mean and what does it mean for us at a personal level?

By the definition provided on dictionary.com, armistice means ‘a temporary suspension of hostilities by agreement of the warring parties; truce’. This is a simple definition for a complex situation.

How do warring nations, particularly on such a large scale, find a point at which they agree to stop fighting?

When we try to imagine what conditions would have been needed with the First World War’s warring nations and the mindsets of these nation’s leaders at the time to bring the war to an end, we cannot help but be amazed that this agreement was reached and sealed.

As Christians, we are likely to also consider that God and the millions of prayers that would have been offered during the wartime would have had significant impact on the agreement to bring the war to an end. And yet … there was a Second World War, and many other wars after that!

Might we consider the wars going on in our own lives? While they may not be on such a scale that makes the world sit up and take notice, they may be significant for us at a personal level. Is this what God wants for us? How do we find peace in our own lives and work towards that as we interact with those in our families, social circles, school and work?

On Sunday, as we remember and pay tribute to those women and men who fought to protect our beautiful Australia and the Australian way of life, let’s reflect on our own lives – the points of tension in our minds and hearts and the tension we might have with others. May we each look for a way of resolving these tensions and pray for those who find themselves in hostile situations that are beyond their means of resolving.